Weather words

Two of my favourite things together: words and weather. The BBC has compiled a short list of unique weather words used in the U.K. These words include gems such as dinderaxe and feefle. Read the full article to learn more wonderful weather words.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170711-the-stories-behind-britains-weirdest-weather-words

When choosing a dictionary has legal consequences

It is not unusual for judges to cite various dictionaries in their judgements to explain their reasoning. But is their a hierarchy of dictionaries? Should the judiciary be turning to the closest dictionary at hand, or should they be more discerning? Here, the Oxford Dictionaries blog takes a look at what impact the choice of dictionary can have.

Obtain, dap, and sponge: when and how do judges use dictionaries?

 

Idioms explained

Have you ever wondered where certain idioms originated? The OUP blog has take the time to explain the meaning behind six popular idioms here: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/11/popular-idioms-explained/

6 popular idioms explained

 

False friends

Just as people sometimes are not who you think they are, words are often not what you think they are. The Oxford Words blog has compiled a helpful guide to the false friends, or words that look the same in different languages but have different meanings, in Shakespeare. In Shakespearean English, the false friends are English words that have shifted meaning from 16th- or 17th-century English to modern English.

Check it out: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/04/shakespeares-false-friends/

Shakespeare and Iambs

Here’s a super neat video on poetic metre, Shakespeare, and all sorts of fun stuff, including pirates!

 

Adjective Order

It can be tricky to figure out how to order adjectives and if they need to be separated by commas. Here is a great article explaining some of the nuances of ordering adjectives.

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_good_word/2014/08/the_study_of_adjective_order_and_gsssacpm.html

The answer to this isn’t in the mouths of Canadians; it’s in the brains of the non-Canadians who hear them, and it’s a thing called categorical perception. – See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/how-canadians-really-pronounce-about?page=1#sthash.9pzwjPY7.dpuf

The answer to this isn’t in the mouths of Canadians; it’s in the brains of the non-Canadians who hear them, and it’s a thing called categorical perception. – See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/how-canadians-really-pronounce-about?page=1#sthash.9pzwjPY7.dpuf

The answer to this isn’t in the mouths of Canadians; it’s in the brains of the non-Canadians who hear them, and it’s a thing called categorical perception. – See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/how-canadians-really-pronounce-about?page=1#sthash.9pzwjPY7.dpuf
The answer to this isn’t in the mouths of Canadians; it’s in the brains of the non-Canadians who hear them, and it’s a thing called categorical perception. – See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/how-canadians-really-pronounce-about?page=1#sthash.9pzwjPY7.dpuf

Shakespearean Phrases

Most people who have studied English literature are well aware that Shakespeare invented more than a few words . . . it’s one of the reasons I use to justify the continued invention of new words and their inclusion in dictionaries (although I’ll admit, I’m quite unlikely to use the word “twerk” anytime soon). Here are two neat articles on Shakespearean words and phrases that are now part of everyday life that few people may even realize Shakespeare invented.

http://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2014/03/24/phrases-from-shakespeare-part-1/

http://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2014/04/01/phrases-from-shakespeare-part-2/

Report a typo

I know I’m not perfect, but that doesn’t stop me from trying. If you spot a typo, error, or mistake on this website, please let me know and I’ll fix it (because typos are embarrassing, especially for someone who calls herself an editor).